Mixed support

In a study done by Michele Acker and Mark Davis in 1992, Sternberg’s triangular theory of love was tested for validity. By studying a population that extended outside the typically studied group of 18 to 20-year-old college students, Acker and Davis were able to study more accurately the stages of love in people. Some criticism of Sternberg’s theory of love is that although he predicted the stages of a person’s love for another person, he did not specify a time or point in the relationship when the stages would evolve. He does not specify whether the different parts of love are dependent on duration of relationship or on the particular stage that relationship has reached. Acker and Davis point out that the stage and duration of the relationship are potentially important to the love component and explore them.

They find that there are no exact answers because not only each couple, but each individual in the couple experiences love in a different way. There are three perceptions of the triangular theory of love, or “the possibility of multiple triangles”. Multiple triangles can exist because individuals can experience each component of love (or point of the triangle) more intensely than another. These separate triangles, according to Acker and Davis and many others, are ‘real’ triangles, ‘ideal’ triangles, and ‘perceived’ triangles.

These ‘real’ triangles are indicative of how each individual views the progress and depth of his or her relationship. The ‘ideal’ triangles are indicative of each individual’s ideal qualities of his or her partner/relationship. The ‘perceived’ triangles are indicative of each individual’s ideas of how his or her partner is viewing the relationship. If any of these three separate triangles do not look the same as a person’s partner’s triangles, dissatisfaction is likely to increase.

Sternberg’s triangular theory of love, may not be as simple as he initially laid it out to be. Sternberg measured his theory on couples who were roughly the same age (mean age of 28) and whose relationship duration was roughly the same (4 to 5 years). His sample size was limited in characteristic variety. Acker and Davis announced this issue as being one of three major problems with Sternberg’s theory. Romantic love, in particular, is not often the same in undergraduate level couples as couples who are not undergrads. Acker and Davis studied a sample that was older than Sternberg’s sample of undergraduates.¬†Sternberg himself did this in 1997.

The two other most obvious problems with Sternberg’s theory of love are as follows. The first is a question of the separate nature of the levels of love. The second is a question of the measures that have previously been used to assess the three levels of love.¬†These problems with Sternberg’s theory continued to be studied, for example Lomas (2018).